About your Search

20130201
20130228
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
director in the office of the secretary of defense, and also country director for morocco and tunisia, and earlier in his career, did quite a bit of work, which i think you'll see brought out up 234 -- in northern mali including 30 trips in that region. ranging well, and delighted to have him on our team. another old friend, dr. ricardo, professor of political science and sociology and a corporation scholar on islam, ricardo, a good friend and colleague, and in the department of shameless self-promotion, i mentioned he and i are editing a book together in the north african revolution, but delighted to have him, and our wives have become friends as well. it's in the family so to speak. timely, last, but not least, dr. onwar, assistant professor of political science, and nonresident senior fellow at the carnegie endowment, and author of quite a number of works, some quite precious in their timing on al-qaeda in the islamic and its effects. you have their bigraphical notes for fuller details. i would note one thing not in the notes, and i can't resist mentioning that while there's few di
that would have been a man, a shopkeeper self-taught and leading into tunisia. the best thing you can do is expect it might ignite at any time and to get ahead of it. so to get our friends in the middle east to reform before the people were in the streets was always trying to get ahead of what happened ultimately and egypt a and tunisia and other places to respect talk about the collapse of the soviet union in terms of what the scholars knew. you were right there. >> i was. we used to laugh when people would say that gorbachev is bound to fall from power. thank you. but when, this was the issue because, the general sense that things are going bad is not enough. people knew that the infrastructure, the political, economic, social soviet union was weak. i went to the soviet union the first time in 1979 to study language. i was there for an extended period of time and i was a student of the soviet military. i remember thinking i had this image of the soviet military as 10 feet tall. and i remember going into a store to buy some little thing for my family, and they were doing the computation
to entirely rule out. the fourth option is chaos that leads to a collapse sparked in tunisia, saudis are very passive but young people increasingly question why can't we have more? why does the royal family take more than their fair share? it may be as the royal family likes to say and as many believe the status quo will hold there are predictions of the royal family that comes through i personally think it could be different because of the extra no pressure in the region against the status quo and the internal information and frustration and the royal family is in this very difficult transition period. i will close with my metaphor for this society which are used in the book of a 747 flying with the cockpit of:jerry hough -- geriatric prince who would be caving in and take over the cockpit and an economy fall of frustrated young people. some islamic fundamentalists who want to turn the plane around to go back to the past and others who want to shoot the pilot and hijack the plane and it continues to fly losing the altitude and there may be somebody on the plane who could landed but it seems
that leads to collapse, sparked by something like in tunisia with a young man buried himself to death. saudi's are very passive, but they also, young people at least increasingly question why can't we have mark whacks might as the royal family take more than their share? said it may be as the royal family likes to say, and as many in the u.s. government to leave, that the status quo will hold. they so with bad predictions about trouble with the royal family and they always come through. i personally think it could be different this time, simply because of the external pressure in the region again the status quo and because of the internal information and frustration and lastly because of royal family is in this very difficult transition. but i will close up my metaphor for the society, which i used in the book of a 747 flying with the cockpit full of geriatric, first class full of princes who would be keen and take over the. economy full of restrictive young people. some islamic fundamentalists who want to turn the plane around and go back to the past and some islamic terrorists who want to
urged leaders in egypt tunisia and libya to recognize women as equal citizens with important contributions to make. we are supporting women entrepreneurs around the world who are creating jobs and driving growth. so. so technology, development, human rights, women. now i know that a lot of pundits hear that and they say, could isn't that all a bit soft? what about the hard stuff? will, that is a false choice. we need both and no one should think otherwise. i will be the first to stand up and proclaim loudly and clearly that america's military might is and must remain the greatest fighting force in the history of the world. i will also make very clear as i have done over the last year's, that our diplomatic power, the ability to convene, our moral suasion is effective because united states can back up our words with action. we will ensure freedom of navigation in all the world sees. 's seas. we will relentlessly go after al qaeda convicts affiliates and its wannabes. we will do what is necessary to prevent iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon. there are limits to what soft pow
in places like liberia. we have urged leaders of egypt tunisia and libya to recognize women as equal citizens with important contributions to make. we are supporting women entrepreneurs around the world and it would creating jobs in driving growth. said technology, development, human rights and women. i know that a lot of pundits are that list and they say isn't that all soft? what about the hard stuff? will, that is a false choice. we need both. and no one should think otherwise. i will be the first to stand up and proclaim loudly and clearly that america's military might is and must remain the greatest fighting force in the history of the world. i will also make very clear as i have done over the last year that our diplomatic power needs the ability to convene our moral suasion is effective because united states can back up our words with action. we will ensure freedom of navigation in all the world to see. we will relentlessly go after al qaeda and its affiliates and wannabes. we will do what is necessary to prevent iran from obtaining a nuke their weapon. there are limits to what
the world, across the monograph from libya to tunisia and beyond. i say to our friends here in the united kingdom, it is in our mutual interest to see that these fledgling democracies flourish. and i want to thank william for his personal and important leadership at the u.k. is showing in marshaling the international community support for libya. i think he and the people at the united kingdom can be proud of their leadership in that the. we obviously discussed syria today. william and i agree the syrian people deserve better than the horrific violence that nowadays and threatens their everyday lives, the lives of innocent people, the lives of people who want the ability to have the government accountable and be able to be part of the governance of their own lives. the assad regime has rained out brackets, but though in recent days. that is just the latest example of assad's brutality. we condemn this indiscriminate killing of innocent civilians and we condemn it in the strongest terms and it is just further evidence that assad has to go. i think william for the u.k. effort to help dial-up
and he was also country direct for more rocco and tunisia and earlier in the career did quite a bit of work we'll see brought occupant out in northern mali including the missions and trips among the foray in the region. we're delighted to have him on our team at the africa center as well as as a friend. we're delighted to have another old friend ricardo rene laremont professor of political science and sociology at begin -- he's been a wood friend and colleague and in the department of shameless self-promotion, i might mention that we are editing a book together on the north african revolutions. but delighted to have him. and also a friend and our wives have become friends as well. in the family, so to speak. and finally, last but not least, dr. anouar bokhars is the professor of political science at mcdaniel college and senior fellow at the middle east program at the carnegieen endowment and author quite a number of works. some fresh end in the their timing al qaeda and slam and -- and the effect. so you the biographical notes for their detail. i would note one thing not in the note
but it is an important one. in tunisia as you follow mentioned the support of the regime and need to go away but they need to be reconstituted in such a way that they serve a democratic state. we need to engage that question if we determine that that is in our interests. we have a failed state. it isn't the subject of a grand policy debate in the country because it seems too far away. but don't pay attention to the problem long enough and see what happens. it will be much less costly for us now to invest in a modest way to reconstitute the bases -- yellowing paper ongoing system to get intimate questions with poverty iain dhaka, and then of course the call continuing in this are a we have to then think about nigeria, northern nigeria. of the are to drive and for today's juan him to drive is another. there's only four days of traveling and its very, very important for us analysts to stop thinking from the national perspective s and start thinking from the regional perspectives. that is the only way that we are going to comprehend the dynamics appear of the challenges that are in front of us a
diplomatic staff in advance of a crisis, from central america to khartoum, from tunisia to yemen, from egypt and mali to and eyes. while dod does not have the primary responsibility for the security of u.s. diplomatic facilities around the world, we do work closely with the state department and support them as requested. in the months prior to the benghazi attack, as i said, we had received from the intelligence community, almost 300 reports on upon threats to american facilities around the world. over the course of the day on september 11th, general dempsey and i received a number of reports of possible threats to u.s. facilities. including those in cairo, egypt. but there are no reports of imminent threats to u.s. personnel or facilities in benghazi. by our best estimate, the incident at the temporary mission facility in benghazi began at about 3:42 p.m., eastern daylight time, on september 11th. the embassy in tripoli was notified of the attacks almost immediately, and within 1 -- 17 minutes of the initial report, africom directed an unmanned surveillance aircraft that was nearby to repos
throughout in the world and not all, obviously are benghazi or tripoli or tunisia. the reality is that in most countries, in the world, we can rely on the host country to provide security. they're there. they're willing to do it. they do a good job. there are some of these embassies in some of these more volatile countries that are of concern. and those were the nineteen that we're designated by the state department as ones we had to look at more closely and develop a better approach to providing security. because there part of the problem is the host countries are not very good at providing that kind of security. >> is there a -- it seems this is so much of a distance in time challenge that when it happens, how quickly can we respond? how far away are we? is there a almost like a playbook for the ambassadors for the people in those facilities that here's the steps to follow. jump on them immediately if it dpunlt click we go this or that? >> the best playbook the general responded this as well. the best playbook is an ambassador who says, we have got serious security problems h
concerning nuclear weapons. libya is obvious, mali, egypt in a state of unrest, now tunisia. we're probably the more unsettled. since the end of the cold war they certainly have ever seen. would you agree with that assessment? >> i absolutely agree. >> meanwhile, signal we send to the radiant is don't worry this aircraft carrier is not coming. this is really a disconnect, the likes of which i have never seen before. now i want to talk about the sequestration because senator graham, senator ayotte and i traveled around warning about the effects of sequestration. we went to a lot of places where men and women in the military say how can we possibly do this, cause this uncertainty in the lives of the men and women who are serving? latest being cancellation of deployment of the aircraft carrier? meanwhile, the president of the united states that it won't happen. during the campaign, won't happen. we're worried for a long time that it was going to happen in this disgraceful to treat the men and women in the military, who we all speak with such advocacy and passion on their behalf to be subject i
concerning nuclear weapons, libya, mali, tunisia and egypt are in various states of unrest which we have no strategy. we are the most unsettled period since the end of the cold war. i have serious concerns as to the quality of senator hagel's professional judgment in the acuity of his views on critical areas of national security including security in the east asia and the middle east. his record on iraq is particularly troubling. as i alluded a moment ago in 2002 he voted to authorize the use of force against iraq. by 2006, the support for the war diminished after republican losses in the 2006 midterm elections. he wrote an opinion piece for "the washington post" under the title "leaving iraq honorable "foreforeshadowing. and president bush announced the decision to surge troops in 2007, senator hagel actively campaigned against it. he voted in february of 2007, in favor of a bill expressing opposition to the surge and in favor of measures to troops from iraq and equally bad policy. he wrote in the 2008 memoir, america our next chapter in historically show that the legislative efforts to
supports basic freedoms in the arab world and will continue to work on places like egypt and tunisia so that the muslim identity of its citizens can be preserved and the democratic aspirations of its people can be realized. as far as the convoy, you know, i'm not privy to intelligence about what the convoy contained. i suspect that either included missile technology or wmd, or israel would not have felt compelled to attack the convoy across the border into syria. and that kind of preemptive action when it comes to offensive weapons or wmd. in my mind it is entirely justified and the united states would be entirely right supporting it. >> thank you, david. your remarks indicate a fastening both this is. it's a great preview to reading it. i look forward to doing exactly that. there's one issue that has been in the literature heavily debated about kosovo, and i think you're in a very good position to clarify the issue. what you've already said makes a negotiated agreement very unlikely, remarks at milosevic were not promising for a negotiated agreement. other scholars have suggested that
. we in the united states have an economy today where we are more unequal than either egypt or tunisia. the inequality is growing. the middle class has been struggling. and again, the gains have gone right up to the very top. we can change that but we have got to have a clear understanding of what we mean by growth so that when we implement our economic policies we do so in a way that helps the great majority of the people. i will give you one example that illustrates this and i am not picking on this family, it is a great family, just using them as an example. spam and bud walton founded walmart, and their errors and the next generation between the two of them have five children and one daughter in law. the six individuals now have greater combined net worth than 1 hundred million americans, the bottom third of our country and again it is not the waltons's fault. it is the result of the policies that are producing this pattern. inequality is growing in europe, japan, inequality is growing in china, growing in indiana and one of the reasons is the emergence of outsourcing and robotssou
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)